In the Kitchen: Pizza Rolls

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Thaw Frozen Yeast Rolls in a muffin tin lined with aluminum cupcake liners.
After they thaw and double in size, (5-8 hours… they work while you work!) pinch apart and stuff with some mozzarella cheese and your favorite pizza toppings.
Drizzle with melted butter and season (I sprinkled with parmesean and garlic powder.)
Bake according to the yeast roll instructions (mine was 375 degrees for 14 minutes)
Dip into your favorite marinara sauce for the weeknight dinner win!

❤️

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August Reading

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling was both familiar and different. Reading in a screenplay format was interesting (Shakespeare in high school and a bit of theatre in college is all I can remember ever reading) but the characters were so familiar that I had to make myself set it down or else I would devour it in hours. (Fantastic Beasts came up on my library hold list this week and after that I am tempted to reread the series again. I caught part of the movie version of Deathly Hallows this past weekend and that only stoked the flame.)

Voyager by Diana Gabaldon was my favorite so far of the Outlander series. I’ve needed to pace myself with this series but it is an excellent escape. This one follows Jamie and Claire over to the Caribbean and America, and sets me up to be really anxious of what might happen to Claire’s daughter in the next book. Can’t wait.

Present over Perfect by Shauna Niequist was an audiobook I had on loan that I didn’t get the chance to finish. It was engaging, but not enough to win out the backlog of podcasts. Maybe another time, because family balance is certainly something relevant for me.

The Lying Game by Ruth Ware is even better than her first two thrillers. After reading The Woman in Cabin 10, I preordered this one and it did not disappoint. She kept me on the hook because HELLO, FIND A SOMEONE YOU TRUST TO WATCH THE BABY!!! The baby has very little to do with the plot, but it certainly keeps you invested in the scene.

Mrs. Fletcher by Tom Perrotta was racy and truly laugh-out-loud funny. Mrs. Fletcher is embarrassing and such an awkwardly funny read. Highly recommend if you liked The Election, or ironic, situational comedy in general. (I confess, I only saw the movie version of Election, but now I want to read that one as well as his others).

I listened to both The Nightbird by Alice Hoffman and Moo by Sharon Creech with my 11 year old daughter on the school commute this month too. Nightbird was an instant favorite. She asked to listen to the end of the book one night before bed because she couldn’t wait until the morning. Moo grew on us, and she loved sympathizing with Moo for the “unreasonable” actions of her parents (her and her brother were volunteered by their parents to help at a local farm). Both excellent for 11 year old girls who like a strong female heroine.

Tell me, what should I read next?

-S

Listening

IMG_4249On the drop-off commute with the 11yr old:

Moo by Sharon Creech

Nightbird by Alice Hoffman

(Listening to library copies through the Overdrive app)

Quick car trips with both girls:

NPR’s Wow in the World science podcast

(New 20-minute show twice a week)

My daily news fix:

NPR’s Up First

(Because 15-20 minutes is my daily limit 😉)

Do you have anything new and fun I should tune to?

Quilting Update

I decided to reverse applique the door for the quilt!

I used a chalk pencil to define my stitch line, then pinned the door to the back (door right side to block wrong side). I used an embroidering stitch on my machine, then cut out the outline from the block. (photographed clockwise)

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The doors will not be uniform in size or location, which I think will add charm to the Christmas village that I hope to create.

 

Hello Stranger!

Goodness, it’s been quite a bit since I’ve blogged. Working and handling everyone’s summer schedule kept my hands full for a bit there, so blogging took the back burner. I haven’t stopped reading, crafting and cooking by no means.

I will start with summer reading, because I have read many excellent books since May. Here goes…

Outlander, Diana Gabaldon- Wow guys, this series is heavy, and I tried to read them back to back, but had to pause for a bit after the second one. Heavy in content, in detail, and in length, and heavy in LOVE. Romantic, heart-wrenching, laugh out loud, LOVE- in it’s very dark and light goodness. This series is a must-read, in my opinion.

Dragonfly in Amber, Diana Gabaldon- see above, stick with it, it’s worth it to keep going, just take a break between novels…

In the Dark Dark Wood, Ruth Ware- The title is much scarier than the story, but very entertaining, even if it’s a bit predictable. Excellent descriptive writing, I felt like I was THERE.

The Curated Closet- Fun, and helpful, if you’re stuck in a style rut and want to make more calculated wardrobe decisions. While I can appreciate minimalism in theory, it is difficult for me in practice.

A Piece of the World, Christina Baker Kline- Inspired by Wyeth’s painting, Christina’s World, this story is dynamic, interesting, and lovely. Kline captures so well the human need for connection. A little depressing though, fair warning.

The Dollhouse, Fiona Davis- This was fast, fun and very twisty. I thought I knew the ending, but was pleasantly surprised.

Short Stack Cookbook: Ingredients that Speak Volumes, Nick Fauchald- I drooled over all the photos, but did not make anything at all before I had to return it to the library. Inspired by good and simple ingredients, and yummy photos, I think it could be a pantry staple. But all it was for me was an excellent escape flip book.

The Woman in Cabin 10, Ruth Ware- So THIS one was better than her first. It was twisty in a way I could not predict. And the description of the scenery was most excellent. I felt trapped right there with her, freezing and feeling paranoid and set up.

I Found You, Lisa Jewell- Wow, now if I had to tell you to read one mystery from this list- this would be it. Her characters are so real, so knowable, and the mystery is not predictable. You follow a young foreign bride, a single mother, and a man with amnesia found on the seashore. Great, great twisty book.

Every Wild Heart, Meg Donohue- It was a little vanilla and boring at times. Maybe because I was reading some good, darker mysteries for a bit there, but I kept wanting this one to get darker.

The Rules Do Not Apply, Ariel Levy- I listened to the audio version of this one. It made my heart ache for her. For love that she needed, for forgiveness, and the experiences she had to endure, just tough. But I guess we all follow our counterfeit gods in one way or another.

The Upstarts: How Uber, Airbnb, and the Killer Companies of the New Silicon Valley are Changing the World- This one is kind of factual and boring. The investor process was a little shocking to me, but ultimately I read this as the news of Uber’s founder & CEO, Travis Kalanick, resigning over allegations of the company culture of sexual harassment. I lost interest.

Stories I Only Tell My Friends, Rob Lowe- I don’t (or I should say, didn’t) know very much about Rob Lowe, only that he’s my favorite actor in St Elmo’s Fire. I didn’t watch the West Wing, but reading this makes me want to binge-watch it. While it is not a tell-all, it’s a fun little Hollywood glimpse at what some well-known actors are really like off-screen, and the Hollywood process in general.

A Perfect Obsession, Heather Graham- Good, but a little too much “weak female, strong rescuing man” characterization.

Salt to the Sea, Ruta Sepytys- This fictional story is based on the real-life tragedy of the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff, and follows four refugees trying to escape war-torn Germany 1945 in the midst of a Soviet advance. It is engaging for both young and old readers, and I would highly recommend. If you like The Book Thief or Echo, you will love this.

Dreamland Burning, Jennifer Latham- Another fantastic and engaging mystery that also explores racial prejudice and entitlement from a teen point of view. Modern-day Rowan discovers skeletal remains during a home renovation and starts digging into the past to solve the mystery. Enlightening the journey is the story of 17-year old Will, and his experiences in a segregated town, leading up to the 1921 Tulsa race riots.

Always and Forever, Lara Jean, Jenny Han- I love this series. The goody-goody high school student in me loves this, because goody-goody Lara Jean can break out with some bold decisions from time to time and it’s so fun to read. Start from the beginning with To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and enjoy every sweet second.

The Screwtape Letters, CS Lewis- I think this is a school read for most kids who have a religious education, so I’m probably the world’s oldest reader of this. It’s Satan talking to an apprentice on how to defeat Christianity, and it makes you think. It goes to some pretty dark, surprising places. If you are praying for a closer walk with God, this would be interesting to read.

The Case Against Sugar, Gary Taubes- Very factual and boring, and the way he presents it makes it sound like we’re doomed and have already doomed future generations.

The Residence, Kate Andersen Brower- Stories about the White House, how it’s run, and the families that reside there are endlessly fascinating to me. I loved this insider look and detailed description from so many staffers during so many decades. I listened to the audio version and especially enjoyed new accounts of the Clinton, George W Bush, and Obama eras.

What have you read this summer? Anything I need to add to my already-packed holds list?

 

Garden Update & Cashmere!

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Somehow I missed the opportunity to photograph the raspberries loaded down with beautiful ripe berries, but they were wonderful while they lasted. I think the birds got to them quicker than me! We have quite a bit of new growth so we are hoping for more berries next year. I need to research pruning to make them easier to access. We have been gifted a volunteer tomato plant in appreciation from the birds also.

The tomato garden is growing great with a few volunteers also. Depending on spacing, we let some of them grow. Sometimes the best producing cherry tomatos are volunteers! We grew tired of the radishes, especially when the weather got warmer and they were spicier, and haven’t picked what remains. The girls wanted lots of cucumbers so we planted two more vines this past weekend in that bed also.

The earliest bed we planted began with turnips, which we harvested completely. Zucchini is now flowering. We are starting to see some fruit and the flowers are gorgeous. We planted a row of zinnias between the zucchini and the cucumbers. After that is a row of bush beans and more cucumbers. Did I mention we love cucumbers?

The rains have slowed and we now have these brief afternoon thunderstorms, enough to give everything a quick drink and make the air really muggy.

As a side note, so much cashmere yarn is on sale at Jimmy Beans wool! I bought a bit of the Lotus Cashmere Fingering for some Christmas gifting. Have you used this brand?