August Reading

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling was both familiar and different. Reading in a screenplay format was interesting (Shakespeare in high school and a bit of theatre in college is all I can remember ever reading) but the characters were so familiar that I had to make myself set it down or else I would devour it in hours. (Fantastic Beasts came up on my library hold list this week and after that I am tempted to reread the series again. I caught part of the movie version of Deathly Hallows this past weekend and that only stoked the flame.)

Voyager by Diana Gabaldon was my favorite so far of the Outlander series. I’ve needed to pace myself with this series but it is an excellent escape. This one follows Jamie and Claire over to the Caribbean and America, and sets me up to be really anxious of what might happen to Claire’s daughter in the next book. Can’t wait.

Present over Perfect by Shauna Niequist was an audiobook I had on loan that I didn’t get the chance to finish. It was engaging, but not enough to win out the backlog of podcasts. Maybe another time, because family balance is certainly something relevant for me.

The Lying Game by Ruth Ware is even better than her first two thrillers. After reading The Woman in Cabin 10, I preordered this one and it did not disappoint. She kept me on the hook because HELLO, FIND A SOMEONE YOU TRUST TO WATCH THE BABY!!! The baby has very little to do with the plot, but it certainly keeps you invested in the scene.

Mrs. Fletcher by Tom Perrotta was racy and truly laugh-out-loud funny. Mrs. Fletcher is embarrassing and such an awkwardly funny read. Highly recommend if you liked The Election, or ironic, situational comedy in general. (I confess, I only saw the movie version of Election, but now I want to read that one as well as his others).

I listened to both The Nightbird by Alice Hoffman and Moo by Sharon Creech with my 11 year old daughter on the school commute this month too. Nightbird was an instant favorite. She asked to listen to the end of the book one night before bed because she couldn’t wait until the morning. Moo grew on us, and she loved sympathizing with Moo for the “unreasonable” actions of her parents (her and her brother were volunteered by their parents to help at a local farm). Both excellent for 11 year old girls who like a strong female heroine.

Tell me, what should I read next?

-S

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