Blooming

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The daffodils and forsythias are blooming and the trees are budding! Everything seems to be about 2 weeks ahead of schedule, so I’ll cross my fingers and hope there’s not a cold snap around the bend. I don’t want these pretty blooms to be frost-bit.

My Spring Momiform will include this lightweight pink jacket (to elevate my standard jeans & t-shirt) and this maxi skirt (dressed up with blouse and booties or down with t-shirt and converse). Finding out what I like to wear through The Curated Closet has been so helpful in making thoughtful choices to freshen up my wardrobe for Spring.

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My spring wardrobe will not include my Campside after all, unfortunately. My Olympic knitting project is an Olympic failure. Back when the Olympics began, I told myself just 6 rows a day would have me blocking by the closing ceremony. But just like staying up past bedtime to see who wins the gold, I haven’t committed past the first few nights. This might be renamed my March Madness project…

How are things blooming for you?

❤️

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Feelings

Anger, Frustration, Hopelessness, Sadness, Fear, or Joy?

Share your feelings with someone today. Listen to someone today. Empathize today. And try again tomorrow. Teach your children to do this by modeling love.

❤️

In the Kitchen: Gluten Free

I am trying to pysch myself up for eating gluten-free again. While I’ve never been diagnosed with celiac disease, I have experienced symptoms of gluten intolerance.

When I went gluten-free last year, my joint pain disappeared, digestive issues improved, and I slept so much better. I know it’s a healthy choice for me, but it’s really difficult without intense meal prep and planning.

I want to go in it with a better game plan this time, so I started by making a list of dinners that my family already eats that are gluten-free (or easily adaptable for me).

Easy GF Dinners:

Taco Bowls with rice
Roasted Chicken, Potatoes and Carrots
Stir Fry Chicken or Shrimp, Squash and Onions
Potato Soup with Sausage
Grilled Chicken or Pork, served over salad
Hash, with potatoes, peppers, and onion
Cheesesteaks (without the bun)

These are the common dinners that my family loves that make it hard to stick with a gluten-free diet:

Spaghetti (I can make with chickpea pasta)
Sandwiches (I can use GF bread)
Pizza (I am doomed)

I haven’t made it beyond list-making. But as good veggies are popping up in the grocery and farmer markets will be opening soon, it seems less daunting.  Does anyone else have this ‘good on paper, bad on follow-through’ problem?

❤️

January Reading

I hit my reading goal this month, easily! I know there are many January-haters out there, and as much as I do not enjoy freezing temps, I love how much I can accomplish this month!

Drums of Autumn, Diana Gabaldon
Fourth in the Outlander series, this is set primarily in America before the American Revolution. Like the other Outlander books I’ve read, this installation in the series is exquisite in detail, romance and daring. And like the others, I always proclaim the last one I read to be the “best”. It’s just long, so carve out some time.

The Horse Dancer, Jojo Moyes
Let me preface this by saying I am a big fan of Jojo Moyes. But this one was slow. So slow in fact I had both the audio and digital version of this last fall, and never got past the first two chapters. But I persisted and borrowed a library copy and ended up loving it in the end. It is romantic in a realistic, modern way. Driving the story is Sarah, an orphaned teen, and her survival story.

Perfect Plates, John Waite
This is a perfect gift for a cookbook lover. The recipes are well-photographed and mostly simple, with known ingredients, yet he pulls together some very unique combinations. The Banana and Blueberry Dutch Baby Pancake is the perfect Saturday morning breakfast, and I’m bringing the Rye Soda Bread with Egg Butter to my next lunch meeting.

Gem & Dixie, Sara Zarr
This young adult selection certainly pulled at my heart. Gem & Dixie are neglected teens with a complicated family system. Both the mother and father do their fair share of loving these girls but yet they continually manipulate them for their own selfish gain due to their own flaws and addictions. My heart breaks for any adolescent that is robbed of the chance of adolescence. Her characterization and dialogue of the teens seem near perfect, and the book highlights the importance of the school support system in a vulnerable teen’s life (all the way from teachers, counselors, to even school cafeteria workers).

All Grown Up, Jamie Attenburg
Someone recommended this one as being funny. I don’t think funny would describe it well. It was ironically humorous at times, but I mostly found it depressive and narcissistic. The character’s lack of identity and struggle to find passion and purpose was insightful, but definitely not funny.

And we’re off?, Dana Schwartz
The premise of this story is a teen artist is offered the opportunity to study abroad, but the mother decides to tag along at the last minute. This one is funny and a bit nightmarish, at least from the teenager’s perspective. She gets an opportunity of a lifetime for some self-discovery, and her broken mother decides to both physically and mentally anchor her. The mother seems less like a helicopter mom, and more just discouraging, pathetic and lost.

Pioneer Woman Cooks, Come and Get It!, Ree Drummond
These really are normal, delicious recipes for a busy life. The Overnight Muesli is easy and delicious, and the Sheet Pan Tofu and Grilled Cheese & Veggie are my new favorite lunch favorites. I’ve never made salmon before, but my daughter and I are going to try to cook the Honey Soy Salmon together the next opportunity. Not all of the recipes are perfectly healthy, but in this cookbook Ree makes healthy also look easy and tempting, a considerable feat.

Rules of Magic, Alice Hoffman
Rules of Magic is a prequel to Practical Magic (which I haven’t read or seen the movie, but I’m reading it next). I will be the millionth person to echo that you don’t have to read Practical Magic before reading this one, and it’s such a beauty that it can stand alone if you wish not to read how the family progresses, as hard as it might be to try. It’s the Owens sisters backstory set in 1950’s New England, and it’s masterful storytelling, capturing both the spirit of the time and the fantasy of magic. I’ve heard the audio version is outstanding, although I only had a library copy and was blown away. I loved it, and would put this on any must-read list.

A Letter to my Congregation, 2nd Edition, Ken Wilson
I believe that most Christians would agree that a defining issue for this generation of believers is the church’s path forward through embracing or excluding people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender. Whether you agree or disagree with the author’s conclusions, I found it was a worthy journey. I was especially moved by his discernment process of prayer, counseling and research, and the afterword he wrote for the second edition, a true “what happened next.” His generosity of spirit and openness touched me. He wrote, “I can appreciate anyone disagreeing [with] me because I have lived long enough to disagree with myself.” I hope I can approach my calling with such humility.

Have you read anything wonderful that you would recommend?

❤️